Setting new standards once more

WE’RE THERE! Introducing the Triple Seven Queen 3, the EN C wing to let YOU fulfill your loftiest flying goals!

The Queen 2 was introduced in 2017 and quickly became the reference glider in the C class, due to its unprecedented mix of user-friendliness and performance. The competition results demonstrated what Queen 2 pilots already knew; finally a glider for the masses which could keep up with the top wings in all but the craziest conditions.

The new model does all that and more. Our designers have opted for a classic EN C design, with 3 line levels just like the Queen 2, and chosen a new material mix with Porcher Skytex. On paper, it may all sound like just a minor revision then – until you fly the wing, and feel the oomph of the performance increase! While you are at it you may also notice that the design team has managed to make the new wing even more accessible and easy to fly; we think this one really feels like an extension of your body and brain! The new Queen 3 – once again setting the standards in its class!

TECHNICAL DATA AND SIZES

Size S MS ML L
Number of cells 73 73  73 73
Projected area (m2) 19.5 20.5 21.7 23.2
Flat area (m2) 23 24.3 25.6 27.4
Projected span (m) 9.4 9.7 9.9 10.3
Flat span (m) 12.0 12.3 12.7 13.1
Projected Aspect Ratio 4.5 4.5 4.5 4.5
Flat aspect ratio 6.2 6.2 6.2 6.2
Glider weight (kg) 4.9 5.2 5.4 5.7
In-flight weight range (kg) 70-85 80-95 90-105 100-119
Certification LTF/EN C C C* C*

MATERIALS

CANOPY FABRIC CODE
Upper surface Porcher Skytex 38
Bottom surface Porcher Skytex 38
Profiles Porcher Skytex hard finish 40
Diagonals Porcher Skytex hard finish 40
Suspension and main lines PPSLS Liros, Edelrid A-8000-U
RISER FABRIC CODE
Fabric 13 mm Kevlar-reinforced Nylon webbing
Pulleys Harken P18mm ball bearing pulley
Maillons Special delta Maillon rapide
Brake attachment Magnet clip-in system

GLIDER PACKAGE

  • Glider Queen 3
  • Backpack BOX in desired size (75,110,150)
  • Inner bag
  • Glider strap
  • Triple Seven T-shirt
  • Repair kit
  • Welcome card
  • Brumel hooks

Reviews

  • Triple Seven Queen 3 SM (75-95)

    One of my preferred gliders in the C category was a Q-Light 2 S size. Handling, turning behavior, feel under it, climb rate in weak, glide, were all 90 % over 100!
    Now Triple Seven introduced the Queen 3 in slightly different sizes than the older model. The SM size I’m test flying goes from 75 to 95 all up certified as a 3 liner EN-C.
    Launching the Queen 3 is less than 5 km/h wind needs a few steps more in order to fill it with air, than regular C’s like Alpina 4, Elan3, Allegro…due to the small intakes on the glider.
    In 25 km wind, it is easier than the mentioned gliders and slower to inflate without the surge. So what you lose when you take off in weak, you gain in windy take-offs.
    I flew the Q3 with my X-rated 6 harness from 90 to 95 all up. The glider can be easily flown at 90, but to be faster when entering the airmass and to give it slightly more dynamism, flying it at 95 would be better.
    The brake travel is relatively short, with probably around 10-12 cm after the 10 cm slack, you can steer the glider in moderate thermals. The Q3 needs just a slight pull to react. However the brakes are slightly harder than the Q light I had if you are flying in strong air, and you need to pull a bit more brakes around 25 cm and more. Considering that an Alpina 4 has a relatively light to moderate pressure, the Elan 3 with its moderate pressure feel, has slightly less brake pressure. But as I said the more you pull, the more pressure there is.
    Flying the Q3 in moderate air, I felt that with the 15 cm gap, the brake pressure is quite normal. Some pilots prefer that solid feel that could give them a secure impression.
    The first 12 cm brake range reminded me of the Artik 6 ones, while the Artik 6 has slightly less brake pressure and a bit more dynamic agility.
    However, I consider the Q3 to be an agile glider similar to the Delta 4 and Alpina 4 but just very slightly slower to complete a 360 radius. The Q light 2 was quite remarkably agile and had more dynamic turning behavior than the new Q3.
    I think Triple Seven wanted to create a much more accessible 3-liner C glider that can give its pilots a much higher (passive safety feel).
    The feedback comes from the risers. In small punchy cores, the Q3 rolls a bit more than the Delta 4, but the pitch stays very neutral and comforting.
    I flew the Q3 in various conditions, to notice that in weak thermals, the glider floats quite nicely and stays inside that weak thermal without losing it. The Q 3 is a good glider when conditions are weak and marginal. I can say it is a floater, with nice climbing properties.
    Gliding in different air masses, I found that the Q3 gets inside any difficult headwind or airmass quite efficiently, but it takes time to enter. Not fast digging through, but slow and efficient.
    Some 3 lines C’s would struggle a bit and lose their glide, some surges forward quickly, while the Q3 stays on hold, slows a bit, but maintain the height and slowly dig through ( Itsy bitsy 😉 …) That’s why I felt that at 95 things could go slightly faster without losing the climb.
    Flying while pushing the speed bar, give the Q3 a very nice glide angle, and the C steering is quite efficient. In turbulent air and while pushing at top speed, I had a few tips collapse, that opened without any reaction on my part.
    Ears are stable, they reopen with a slight brake pull. Induced asymmetries resemble a B glider, smooth and slow. Pushing the bar on the Q3 gave me around +13 km at 800 ASL.
    Now to explore every point on the Q3, I saw that Triple Seven made a knot on the C’s called Cowboy loop …It reduces 1 cm of the C lines. For my own curiosity, I released it first by a simple knot and second without a knot.
    In a single loop, things got much better, with a nicer feel through the air in thermals, in the airmass…etc but a 10 % increase in movements.
    With no loops, the (new glider) felt more alive! It turned much better and is faster through the air, but requires some 35 % more pilot control, and when accelerated some small collapses occurred. So I think, it’s better to keep the knot after some 50 hours, and to explore the possibilities…
    Conclusion: Triple Seven stayed with a conventional 3 liner with a 6.2 aspect ratio, for now…to prove that it flies really well, has a higher passive safety, and is easier to understand than the Queen 2. The spices of feel and handling are slightly more tamed than the Queen 2 ones, but the overall performance is surely improved. The Queen 3 is a mid-C glider in terms of feel in overall conditions.
    So I think after being one full season on a Rook3, the Queen 3 is a logical evolution to stay on the safe side of the C certification.

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